Free Mushroom Charts And Mushroom Illustrations To Print

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Vintage Natural History Mushroom Charts & Drawings

I got the inspiration to curate this wonderful collection of vintage mushroom charts and mushroom drawings from a recent trip to London.

I love wandering around interior shops and the other day I was in the H&M home flagship store in London when I spotted a dinner service with printed mushroom illustrations design.

H&M Mushroom plate

Did you know that the entire organism is actually known as the fungi and the mushroom is the fruit of the fungi? Therefore all mushrooms are fungi but not all fungi produce mushrooms.

The terms “mushroom” and “toadstool” go back centuries and were never precisely defined, nor was there a consensus on their application.

Whatever you call them, mushrooms, fungi or toadstools, these vintage illustrations are wonderful. They would look great framed in any kitchen, especially in those homes with a more country cottage or farmhouse vibe.

To download the higher resolution of the mushroom image you want, simply click the title above.

mushroom charts

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The Mushroom Charts and Mushroom Art

1. Adolphe Millot “Champignon” – Mushroom Chart

This is a wonderful vintage mushroom chart with over 69 individual mushroom illustrations by the fabulous French naturalist artist Adolphe Millot.

This particular chart is from the French language encyclopedia “Nouveau Larousse illustré“.

There is a key at the bottom of the mushroom chart naming each species. Also, each mushroom illustration is assigned one of the four letters:

  1. C for comestibles – edible mushrooms
  2. V for vénéneux – poisonous mushrooms
  3. S for suspect – Suspect mushrooms
  4. I for indifferent – Indifferent
Adolphe Millot Mushroom chart

2. Adolphe Millot – Second Mushroom Chart

Another mushroom poster from Adolphe Millot. This one is from the book “Illustrations for Le Larousse Pour Tous“.

Each mushroom is named individually and assigned with one of the same letters from the other Adolphe mushroom chart above.

Mushroom botanical poster

3. 1886 Mushroom Illustrations

This chart is from an 1886 Botanical Atlas by the Italian botanist Giovanni Briosi.

They look like edible mushrooms to me in this chart, however, I wouldn’t want to risk it.

There are many folk traditions about what are the defining features of a poisonous mushroom. From how they look in both shape and colour, to whether they turn rice red once boiled or even blacken silver.

There are no general identifiers for poisonous mushrooms, so such traditions are unreliable. Guidelines to identify particular mushrooms exist and will work only if you are an expert in identifying toxic mushrooms.

Mushroom drawings

4. Another 1886 Mushroom Poster

Another group of mushroom drawings from the same book as above. This mushroom chart is more colourful.

mushroom poster

5. 1889 Mushroom Chart

This mushroom illustration is from the 1889 German illustrated encyclopedia “Meyers Konversationslexikon

The German text at the top of the chart simply translates as “mushrooms the description of the species itself under the preceding names”.

There is a species of mushroom that if cooked in a certain way tastes just like fried chicken. It is actually known as “the chicken of the woods“. It is found all over the world.

1889 mushroom drawings

6. Edible Fungi -1908

This collection of fungi illustrations are from the 1908 edition of “The Americana; a universal reference library, comprising the arts and sciences, literature, history, biography, geography, commerce, etc., of the world

Edible fungi print

7. English Mushrooms 1797

This wonderful illustrated drawing of English mushrooms is from the book “Coloured figures of English fungi or mushrooms“. By the English naturalist and illustrator, James Sowerby.

This particular mushroom is Armillaria mellea also known as a Honey Fungus. It is edible but some people can be intolerant to it. The fungi tend to grow at the root of trees and plants.

English mushrooms illustration

8. 1797 – Coprinellus disseminatus Mushrooms

Another illustration from Sowerby’s book this is of the edible Coprinellus disseminatus (fairy inkcap) mushrooms.

Fairy inkcaps

9. 1797 – Coprinopsis picacea fungi

Another one of Sowerby’s British fungi illustrations. This is a poisonous fungus Coprinopsis picacea, also called the magpie fungus.

Magpie fungus

10. 1797 – Laccaria amethystina

Another British mushroom illustration by Sowerby. The amethyst deceiver, an edible but not particularly tasty mushroom.

Even though the mushroom is edible it can absorb toxins from the soil it grows in.

Amethyst deceiver mushroom

11. 1847 – British Toadstool

An almost fairytale-like print of British toadstools. The artwork is by Anna Maria Hussey and from the book “Illustrations of British Mycology“.

Arguably the most iconic toadstool species, the fly agaric is a large white-gilled, white-spotted, usually red mushroom, and is one of the most recognizable and widely encountered in popular culture“.

toadstool

12. 1847 – Russula emetica

Another wonderful mushroom painting by Anna Maria Hussey. This beautiful looking mushroom is often referred to the sickener.

This is due to the unfortunate effect the mushroom can have have on the stomach when eaten raw. However, if parboiled or pickled the toxicity of this mushroom can be removed.

Mushroom sickener
mushroom illustrations

You might want to check out these other wonderful vintage botanical images on the blog.

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